JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS

2016 and In Press

Ahlstrom, B., Dinh, T., Haselton, M. G., & Tomiyama, A. J. (in press). Understanding eating interventions through an evolutionary lens. Health Psychology Reviews.

In 1 Bite: Can an evolutionary perspective help health psychologists design more effective eating interventions and policies? This article describes how!

Incollingo Rodriguez, A. C., Heldreth, C. M., & Tomiyama, A. J. (2016). Putting on weight stigma: A randomized study of the effects of wearing a fat suit on eating, well-being, and cortisol. Obesity.

In 1 Bite: Ever wondered what life is like for people who are heavy? In this study Angela, Courtney, and Dr. T put participants in a fat suit to see how it affected their feelings, eating, and antifat attitudes.

Tomiyama, A. J., Hunger, J. M., Nguyen-Cuu, J., & Wells, C. (2016). Misclassification of cardiometabolic health when using body mass index categories in NHANES 2005–2012. International Journal of Obesity. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2016.17. PMID: 26841729

In 1 Bite: Is BMI a good measure of health? Dr. T, Jeff, and Jolene found that an estimated 54 million US adults are classified as cardiometabolically unhealthy when they're not.


Alcalá, H.E., von Ehrenstein, O.S., & Tomiyama, A. J. (2016). Adverse childhood experiences and use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products. Journal of Community Health. PMID: 27000040

In 1 Bite: Do childhood adversities impact tobacco use? Drs. Alcalá, von Ehrenstein and Dr. T find that some childhood adversities are associated with increased tobacco product use among US adults.


2015

Incollingo Rodriguez, A. C., Epel. E. S., White, M. L., Standen, E. C., Seckl., J. R., & Tomiyama, A. J. (2015). Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation and cortisol activity in obesity: A systematic review. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 62, 301-318. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2015.08.014

In 1 Bite: Cortisol and obesity - is there a link? In this review, grad student Angela, undergrads Erin Standen and Megan White, and Dr. T find that the literature is messier than you'd think.


Cummings, J. R., Ray, L. A. & Tomiyama, A. J. (2015). Food-alcohol competition: As young females eat more food, do they drink less alcohol? Journal of Health Psychology. doi: 10.1177/1359105315611955

In 1 Bite: Can gluttony rival lush behavior? Grad student Jenna, addictions researcher Dr. Lara Ray, & Dr. T found that when girls ate more sweet high-fat & fast foods they drank less alcohol.


Hunger, J. M. & Tomiyama, A. J. (2015). A call to shift the public health focus away from weight. American Journal of Public Health.

In 1 Bite: In this Letter to the Editor, Jeff and Dr. T argue that it's time to stop focusing on weight and start focusing on actual indicators of health.


Finch, L. E. & Tomiyama, A. J. (2015). Comfort eating, psychological stress, and depressive symptoms in young adult women. Appetite, 95, 239-244. PMID: 26192221

In 1 Bite: Does comfort eating actually comfort? Laura & Dr. T found that comfort eating can buffer the impact of negative life experiences on psychological stress, but only for non-depressed women.


Puterman, E., Prather, A. A., Epel, E. S., Loharuka, S., Adler, N. E., Laraia, B. A., & Tomiyama, A. J. (2015). Exercise mitigates cumulative associations between stress and BMI in girls age 10-19. Health Psychology, PMID: 26301595

In 1 Bite: In this prior paper, Dr. T found that long-term stress is related to long-term BMI gain. Now, the team finds that exercise can break that link.


[All authors made equal contributions] Mann, T., Tomiyama, A. J., & Ward, A. (2015). Promoting public health in the context of the “obesity epidemic”: False starts and promising new directions. Perspectives on Psychological Science.

In 1 Bite: Several misconceptions about obesity have held us back when promoting health. This paper debunks those and offers suggestions for new policy initiatives.


Himmelstein, M. S. & Tomiyama, A. J. (2015). It’s not you, it’s me: Self-perceptions, antifat attitudes and stereotyping of obese individuals. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 6(7), 749-757. 1948550615585831.

In 1 Bite: Where do all these negative attitudes toward heavy individuals come from? This paper suggests that people's thoughts and feelings about their own bodies influences antifat attitudes.


Incollingo Rodriguez, A. C., Finch, L. E., Buss. J., Guardino, C. M., & Tomiyama, A. J. (2015). An experimental field study of weight salience and food choice. Appetite, 89, 215-218. PMID: 25698080

In 1 Bite: In a world where weight is on everyone's minds, how might just seeing an image of an overweight person influence how we eat? In this field study, the DiSH team attempts to answer that question.


Giuliani, N. R., Tomiyama, A. J., Mann, T., & Berkman, E. T. (2015). Prediction of daily food intake as a function of measurement modality and restriction status. Psychosomatic Medicine, 77(5), 583-590. PMID: 25984820

In 1 Bite: Brain scans versus self-report - what's the better measure? As usual - it depends! This paper describes what predicts eating in everyday life, and how dieting fits in.


Incollingo Rodriguez, A. C., Tomiyama, A. J., Ward, A.(2015). What does weight stigma smell like? Cross-modal influence of visual weight cues on olfaction. International Journal of Obesity. 39(6), 1030-1032. PMID: 25649689.

In 1 Bite: Using a tricky manipulation, Angela, Dr. T, and Andrew Ward found that people perceived scents as less appealing when in the presence of an image of a heavy individual versus a thin one.


Tomiyama, A. J., Finch, L. E., & Cummings, J. R. (2015). Did that brownie do its job? Stress, eating, and the biobehavioral effects of comfort food. Invited contribution (peer-reviewed) to Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, R. Scott & S. Kosslyn, Eds. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons

In 1 Bite: Dr. T and DiSH Lab Grad Students Laura and Jenna review the existing research on the phenomenon of "comfort eating," offering insightful future areas for research.


Himmelstein, M.S, Incollingo Belsky, A. C., & Tomiyama, A. J. (2015). The weight of stigma: Cortisol reactivity to manipulated weight stigma. Obesity, 23(2), 368-374. PMID: 25522347

In 1 Bite: Do you have to be overweight to experience the stress of weight stigma? This paper says no! And that weight stigma can actually affect your stress hormone levels.


Lowry, D.W., Tomiyama, A. J. (2015). Air displacement plethysmography versus dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in underweight, normal-Weight, and overweight/obese individuals. PLOS One, 10(1). PMID: 25607661.

In 1 Bite: The BodPod is a neat device that lets you estimate body fat. But is it accurate at the extremes of body size? This paper suggests that, especially for very thin individuals, it might not be.


2014

Tomiyama, A. J., Finch, L. E., Incollingo Belsky, A. C., Buss, J., Finley, C., Schwartz, M. B., & Daubenmier, J. (2014). Weight bias in 2001 versus 2013: Contradictory attitudes among obesity researchers and health professionals. Obesity, 23, 46-53. PMID: 25294247

In 1 Bite: This study indicates that weight stigma is still widespread today. There’s hope for the future, however, as some forms of weight bias have declined since 2001.


Aschbacher, K., Rodriguez-Fernandez, M., van Wietmarschen, H., Jain, S., Epel, E. S., Tomiyama, A. J., Doyle, F., & van der Greef, J. (2014). The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-leptin axis and metabolic health: A systems approach to resilience, robustness and control. Interface Focus, 4(5), 20140020. PMID: 25285198

In 1 Bite: Borrowing concepts from engineering, this paper looks at how our stress and metabolic systems function as a whole, intertwined system.


Tomiyama, A. J. (2014). Weight stigma is stressful: A review of evidence for the Cyclic Obesity/Weight-Based Stigma Model. Appetite, 82, 8-14. PMID: 24997407

In 1 Bite: Weight stigma feels bad, but could it even result in weight gain? Dr. T constructs a model to explain this vicious cycle.


Tomiyama, A. J., Epel, E. S., McClatchey, T. M., Poelke, G., Kemeny, M. E., McCoy, S., & Daubenmier, J. (2014).Associations of weight stigma with cortisol and oxidative stress independent of adiposity. Health Psychology, 33, 862-867. PMID: 25068456

In 1 Bite: Can weight stigma get under our skin? This study examines the relationship between weight stigma and biological stress and long-term cellular aging.


[First two authors made equal contributions] Epel, E. S., Tomiyama, A. J., Mason, A. E., Laraia, B. A., Hartman, W., Ready, K., Acree, M., Adam, T. C., St. Jeor, S., & Kessler, D. (2014). The reward-based eating drive scale: A self-report index of reward-based eating. PLOS One, 9(6). PMID: 24979216

In 1 Bite: Food might be addictive, just like other rewarding substances like alcohol or drugs. In this paper, you can take a 9-question test to see how rewarding food is to you.


Incollingo Belsky, A. C., Epel, E. S., & Tomiyama, A. J. (2014). Clues to maintaining calorie restriction? Psychosocial profiles of successful long-term restrictors. Appetite, 79, 106-112. PMID: 24747211

In 1 Bite: What makes a good dieter? Dr. T, Elissa Epel, and DiSH Lab Grad Student Angela Incollingo Belsky take a look at successful dieters to see if certain qualities are key to dieting success.


Hunger, J. M., & Tomiyama, A. J., (2014). Weight labeling and obesity: A 10-year longitudinal study of girls aged 10-19. Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics, 168(6), 579-580. PMID: 24781349

In 1 Bite: This paper explains a surprising finding about the long-term consequences of calling someone "fat."


Giuliani, N. R., Mann, T., Tomiyama, A. J., & Berkman, E. T. (2014). Neural systems underlying the reappraisal of personally-craved foods. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 7, 1390-1402. PMID: 24392892

In 1 Bite: Ever wonder what is going on in our our brains when we can't resist that delicious treat? This study highlights the brain regions underlying self-regulation and food cravings.


2013

Tomiyama, A. J., Ahlstrom, B., & Mann, T. (2013). Evaluating eating behavior treatments by FDA standards. Frontiers in Psychology, 4, 1009. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.01009. PMID: 24427153

In 1 Bite: Would dieting pass the FDA's standards as a viable treatment for obesity? Probably not, according to this article.


Tomiyama, A. J., Ahlstrom, B., & Mann, T. (2013). Long-term effects of dieting: Is weight loss related to health? Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 7(12), 861-877.

In 1 Bite: Does losing weight improve health? This review examines the dieting literature and finds a surprising (and controversial) answer to this question.


Tomiyama, A. J., & Mann, T. (2013). If shaming reduced obesity, there would be no fat people. Hastings Center Report, 43, 4-5. PMID: 23650055

In 1 Bite: Dr. T. and Traci Mann respond to Daniel Callahan's controversial claim that weight stigma can reduce obesity.


Tomiyama, A. J., Puterman, E., Epel, E., Rehkopf, D., & Laraia, B. A. (2013). Chronic psychological stress and racial disparities in Body Mass Index change between black and white girls aged 10-19. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 45, 3-12. PMID: 22993022

In 1 Bite: Using the big difference in obesity rates between Black and White females as a starting point, this study looks at race as a component in the stres-obesity link over a 10-year time period.


2012

Tomiyama, A. J. (2012). Beyond interventions: Caloric restriction as a scientific model. Psychosomatic Medicine, 74(6), 665-666. PMID: 22753628

In 1 Bite: This paper discusses calorie restriction’s impact on the life span, focusing on long-term human calorie restrictors and their unique success with lasting eating behavior change.


[First two authors made equal contributions] Tomiyama, A. J., Schamarek, I., Lustig, R. H., Kirschbaum, C., Puterman, E., Havel, P. J., & Epel, E. S. (2012). Leptin concentrations in response to acute stress predict subsequent intake of comfort foods. Physiology & Behavior, 107, 34-39. PMID: 22579988

In 1 Bite: How can you avoid stress eating? This study focuses on the role of a certain hormone, leptin, in making you eat less even when you’re stressed out.


Tomiyama, A. J., O’Donovan, A., Lin, J., Puterman, E., Lazaro, A., Chan, J. K., Dhabar, F., Wolkowitz, O., Kirschbaum, C., Blackburn, E., & Epel, E. S. (2012). Does cellular aging relate to patterns of allostasis? An examination of basal and stress reactive HPA axis activity and telomere length. Physiology & Behavior, 106, 40-45. PMID: 22138440

In 1 Bite: This study looks at how stress might get under the skin to make us age faster.


O’Donovan, A., Tomiyama, A. J., Lin, J., Puterman, E., Kemeny, M., Wolkowitz, O., Blackburn, E., & Epel, E. S. (2012). Stress appraisals and cellular aging: A key role for anticipatory threat in the relationship between psychological stress and telomere length. Brain Behavior and Immunity, 26(4), 573-579. PMID: 22293459

In 1 Bite: Can our thoughts influence aging? This study looks at the way we respond to upcoming stressful situations and whether that is related to cellular aging.


2011

Tomiyama, A. J., & Mann, T. (2011). Commentary on Crum, Corbin, Brownell, And Salovey (2011). Health Psychology.

In 1 Bite: Dr. T. and Traci Mann comment on the surprising findings in Mind over milkshakes: mindset, not just nutrients, determine ghrelin response, research by Crum and colleagues.


Tomiyama, A. J., Dallman, M. F., & Epel, E. S. (2011). Comfort food is comforting to those most stressed: Evidence of the chronic stress response network in high stress women. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 36, 1513-1519. PMID: 21906885.

In 1 Bite: Dr. T finds that really stressed out people do more comfort eating - plus they have lower cortisol responses to stress, and lower cortisol levels in general.


Prather, A. A. Puterman, E., Lin, J., O’Donovan, A., Krauss, J., Tomiyama, A. J., Epel, E.S., & Blackburn, E. H. (2011). Shorter leukocyte telomere length in midlife women with poor sleep quality. Journal of Aging Research, 2011, 721390. PMID: 22046530

In 1 Bite: Could tossing and turning make you older? This study looks at the relationship between sleeping poorly and cellular aging.


Puterman, E., O’Donovan, A., & Adler, N. E., Tomiyama, A.J., Kemeny, M. E., Epel, E. S. (2011). Physical activity moderates effects of stressor-induced rumination on cortisol reactivity. Psychosomatic Medicine, 73, 604-611. PMID: 21873586

In 1 Bite: Exercise your stress away: this study investigates the positive impact of a physically active lifestyle in dealing with stress.


2010

Tomiyama, A. J., Mann, T., Vinas, D., Hunger, J. M., DeJager, J., & Taylor, S. E. (2010). Low calorie dieting increases cortisol. Psychosomatic Medicine, 72, 357-364. PMID: 20368473

In 1 Bite: Is dieting stressful? Oprah says yes, and so does this study that shows that dieting increases both mental stress and the stress hormone cortisol.


Tomiyama, A. J. & Dallman, M. F. (2010). The cortisol-cortisone shuttle in caloric restriction. Psychosomatic Medicine, 72, 599-600. PMID: 20595418

In 1 Bite: Dr. T and Mary Dallman respond to criticism that they didn’t measure all of the hormones they should have in their “Low Calorie Dieting Increases Cortisol” study.


Frosch, D. L., Saxbe, D., Tomiyama, A. J., Glenn, B. A., Low, C. A., Hanoch, Y., Motivala, S. J., Meeker, D. (2010). Assessing the scholarly impact of Health Psychology: A citation analysis of articles published from 1993 to 2003. Health Psychology, 29(5), 555-562. PMID: 20836611

In 1 Bite: Checking up on Health Psychology’s sphere of influence, this paper counts up how often the journal’s articles make it into other articles in psychology, medicine, and health.


2009

Tomiyama, A. J., Moskovich, A., Byrne Haltom, K., Ju, T., & Mann, T. (2009). Consumption after a diet violation: Disinhibition or compensation? Psychological Science, 20(10), 1275-1281. PMID: 19732383

In 1 Bite: Breaking your diet may not lead to total failure! This study tests to see whether dieters can control their eating outside a lab setting after violating the rules of their diet.


Tomiyama, A. J., Mann, T., Comer, L. (2009). Triggers of eating in everyday life. Appetite, 52, 72-82. PMID: 18773931

In 1 Bite: This study takes eating out of the lab and into the real world, using hourly reports to identify eating triggers in the context of everyday life.


2008

Motivala, S. J., Tomiyama, A. J., Ziegler, M., Khandrika, S., & Irwin, M. R. (2008). Nocturnal levels of ghrelin and leptin and sleep in chronic insomnia. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 34(4), 540-545. PMID: 19059729

In 1 Bite: Can a lack of zzz’s increase your lbs.? This study measures hormone levels in chronic insomnia patients to explore how sleep deprivation might impact energy regulation and weight.


Tomiyama, A.J., & Mann, T. (2008). Focusing on weight is not the answer to America’s obesity epidemic. American Psychologist, 63, 203-204. PMID: 18377114

In 1 Bite: Dr. T and Traci Mann respond to criticism of their claim that “Diets are not the Answer” to obesity, reaffirming the importance of a focus on direct measures of health instead of weight in general.


Tomiyama, A. J., & Mann, T. (2008). Cultural factors in collegiate eating disorder pathology: When family culture clashes with individual culture. Journal of American College Health. 57(3), 309-314. PMID: 18980887

In 1 Bite: Is a close family always a good thing? This paper looks at families from different cultures to explore the link between extreme family closeness and symptoms of eating disorders.


2007

Mann, T., Tomiyama, A.J., Lew, A.M., Westling, E., Chatman, J., & Samuels, B. (2007). Medicare's search for effective obesity treaments: Diets are not the answer. American Psychologist, 62, 220-233. PMID: 17469900

In 1 Bite: Is dieting really an effective treatment for obesity? This is a review of the long-term outcomes of calorie-restricting diets to see if diets really lead to lasting weight loss or health benefits.


Yancey, A. K., & Tomiyama, A.J. (2007). Physical activity as primary prevention to address cancer disparities. Seminars in Nursing Oncology, 23(4), 253-263. PMID: 18022053

In 1 Bite: What is the link between exercise and cancer? This study looks at whether exercising can reduce your risk of cancer, especially if you are part of an underserved population.


2006

Keller, H., Lamm, B., Abels, M., Yovsi, R., Jensen, H., Papligoura, Z., Holub, C., Lo, W., Tomiyama, A. J., Su, Y., Wang, Y., Chaudary, N (2006). Cultural models, socialization goals, and parenting ethnotheories: A multi-cultural analysis. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 37. 155-172. DOI: 10.1177/0022022105284494

In 1 Bite: This paper considers different cultural beliefs from around the globe and how they may or may not affect parenting styles.


BOOK CHAPTERS

Finch, L. E., Tomiyama, A. J. (2014). Stress-induced eating dampens physiological and behavioral stress responses. In Ronald R. Watson (Ed.), Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Abdominal Obesity. New York: Elsevier.

In 1 Bite: This chapter reviews how comfort eating and even belly fat can work together to reduce stress biologically.


Epel, E. E., Tomiyama, A. J., & Dallman, M. F. (2012). Stress and reward neural networks, eating, and obesity. In Kelly D. Brownell & Mark S. Gold (Eds.), Handbook of Food and Addiction. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN: 0199738165

In 1 Bite: If eating is the flame, stress is the fuel. This chapter talks about stress and how it can make our brains more prone to food "addiction."


Yancey, A. K., Tomiyama, A. J., & Keith, N. R. (2009). Addressing diversity and health literacy at the worksite. In N. Pronk (Ed.), Healthy worker, healthy company: ACSM Worksite Health Handbook (2nd ed.). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. ISBN: 0736074341

In 1 Bite: This chapter talks about how to help people from underserved groups be healthy in the workplace, using obesity prevention as an example.



The publications provided are for academic or educational use only.